Only trigger a release when the build changed

Back in the early days, when we used XAML builds in TFS (wow that seems like ages ago!), we had the possibility to NOT execute a build when nothing changed in the source code repository. This checkbox “Build even if nothing has changed” does not exist anymore in VSTS.

For me this is not a real problem, when you build your source code, it is also a validation if your underlying system is OK. It is more a problem when you automatically trigger a release pipeline after a nightly build. Why should you release a new version of your application, when it is not a new version but exactly the same version. Of course, we can discuss that it should not be a problem, that you should always be able to release, but still. It is unneccessary and sometimes even not wanted.
Read more →

Created an open source VSTS build & release task for Azure Web App Virtual File System

I’ve created a new VSTS Build & Release task to help you interact with the (VFS) Virtual File System API (Part of KUDU API of your Azure Web App). Currently this task can only be used to delete specific files or directories from the web app during your build or release workflow. It will be updated in the near future to also be able to list files or to upload / download files through the VFS API

The reason i made this task was that i needed it at my current customer. We’re deploying our custom solution to a Sitecore website running on Azure web apps using MSDeploy. The deployment consists of 2 parts: an install of the out-of-the-box Sitecore installation and the deployment of our customisations. When deploying new versions we want to keep the Sitecore installation and MSDeploy will update most of our customisations. Some customisations however create artifacts that stay on the server and aren’t  in control of the MSDeploy package that can cause errors on our web application. This new VSTS Build / Release task can help you delete these files. In the future this task will be updated with other functionality of the VFS API such as listing, uploading or downloading files.

The task is available in the VSTS Marketplace and is open source on github.

Let’s have a look how to use this task and how it works under the hood.
Read more →

Building, testing and deploying precompiled Azure Functions

Azure functions are great to build small specialized services really fast. When you create an Azure Functions project by using the built-in template from the SDK in Visual Studio you’ll automatically get a function made in a CSX file. This looks like plain old C# but in fact it is actually  is C# Script. When you’re deploying these files to Azure you don’t have to compile them locally or on a build server but you can just upload them to your Azure Storage directly.

In the last update for Azure Functions the option to build precompiled functions was added. Doing this is actually pretty simple. I’ve created a sample project on Github containing a precompiled Azure function, unit tests for the function and an ARM template to deploy the function. Lets go over the steps to create a precompiled Azure function.

Read more →

A better way (and script) to add a Service Principal in Azure for VSTS

From Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) it’s possible to deploy to an Azure Subscription using an Active Directory Service Principal.

The Microsoft documentation refers to a blog post which describes a 3-clicks and a manual way to setup this principal.

Although the information on the blog post for the 3-clicks setup is still actual, the script link provided for the manual configuration is not available anymore (not found, probably because the Git repo has been moved/renamed).

For both the suggested ways (3-clicks or manual), there are some concerns from my side about the principal setup, which I think they could be improved:

  • The principal which is created during the process gets the “Contributor” role granted on the whole Azure subscription, and using the manual powershell script, the default role is even “Owner” (this can be modified).
  • The name of the Active Directory Application/Principal is some random guid which is difficult to be identified, see this picture:

Read more →

Running Powershell Pester unit test in a VSTS build pipeline

When you are developing Powershell scripts, creating some unit tests will help you in monitoring the quality of the scripts. Writing some tests will give you some assurance that your code still works after you make some changes. Writing Powershell unit tests can be done with Pester. Pester will enable you to test your Powershell scripts from within Powershell. It is a set of Powershell functions for unit testing Powershell. These functions will allow you to mock and isolate the Powershell code under test. When you want to integrate your unit test into your VSTS build pipeline, you need an build extension to run then in your build pipeline.
Read more →

Use VSTS to deploy Functions as Infrastructure as Code

Azure Functions enable you to easily run small pieces of code in the cloud. To do this right, you need to setup continuous delivery of the infrastructure and the code involved. Otherwise you will end with an uncontrolled environment where nobody knows what code is actually running. In this blog post I’ll describe how to setup a deployment pipeline for Functions with VSTS. This will enable you to deploy Functions as Infrastructure as Code.

vstsfunctionpipelineFrom an deployment perspective an Azure Function contains of two parts:

Read more →

Lock Azure resources to prevent accidental deletion

In some cases you want to protect critical resources from accidental deletion. Some examples are a storage account with source data for processing, a Key Vault with disk encryption keys, or another key component in your infrastructure. When losing some resources that are key in your infrastructure, recovery can be dramatic. Resource Manager locks will enable you to protect these critical resources from deletion.

Read more →

Created an open source VSTS build & release task for Sitecore.Ship

At my current customer we’re implementing an Azure environment which also contains a Sitecore application. We’re using VSTS to for all aspects of the application development lifecycle from agile planning to source control and automated builds & releases. In the release pipeline we can use the out of the box Azure web deploy build steps to deploy our code to our web app which is a Sitecore instance. The next step is to be able to also deploy the Sitecore content we created as code using TDS to our Sitecore Site.

Sitecore.Ship is an open source project which makes it easy to deploy Sitecore .Update files to your Sitecore Instance. It is created by Kevin Obee and it can be found here on Github

in our Build we build our TDS projects using MSBuild to generate .Update files which we can then deploy in our release pipeline to Sitecore. There was one problem however which was that there was no build task to do this. Since my role at my current client is supporting all the development teams in improving their continuous delivery process i decided to create a task to make their life easier.

sitecoreship

Sitecore.Ship build task

You can download the build task now in the VSTS marketplace.

To be able to upload your .update files using Sitecore.Ship you have to install Sitecore.Ship on your Sitecore instance first. when you’ve done that don’t forget to whitelist the IP address of your build server in the web.config so Sitecore.Ship will allow your build server to do the deployment.

After that add my Sitecore Ship VSTS task to your workflow, select the .update file and the URL of your Sitecore site and you’re done.

The task works for both VSTS and TFS 2015/2017 and works for your sitecore site hosted on prem or in Azure.

2

Open Source

Of course this VSTS task is open source and the source can be found here on Github

the tasks is uploading the sitecore packages through powershell. even if you are not using powershell you might want to use this piece of powershell if you want to upload things to Sitecore using Sitecore.Ship manually. The script is quite basic setting up a httpclient that sends the files to Sitecore through http Post.

If you want to run the powershell script manually you have to replace to 2 lines that retrieve the parameters from the build task to parameters that are sent to the script.

This is the first VSTS build task i’ve created so please let me know if you like it or if you have feedback in improving this task by leaving a comment here or on Github.

also check out one of the many other VSTS build tasks made by my colleagues from Xpirit

Happy deploying!

Geert van der Cruijsen

The post Created an open source VSTS build & release task for Sitecore.Ship appeared first on Mobile First Cloud First.