This post is the final part of a six-part series on Microservices Principles. Other parts are: Business Capability,  Autonomy, Small bounded context, Asynchronous Communication and Best Technology.

 

Microservices are a hot topic. Because of that a lot of people are saying a lot of things. To help organizations make the best of this new architectural style Xebia has defined a set of principles that we feel should be applied when implementing a Microservice Architecture. This blog explains why a Microservice should be the responsibility of exactly one team (but one team may be responsible for more services).

Being responsible for the full life cycle of a service means that a single team can deploy and manage a service as well as create new versions and retire obsolete ones. This means that users of the service have a single point of contact for all questions regarding the use of the service. This property makes it easier to track changes in a service. Developers can focus on a specific area of the business they are supporting so they will become specialists in that area. This in turn will lead to better quality. The need to also fix errors and problems in production systems is a strong motivator to make sure code works correctly and problems are easy to find.
Having different teams working on different services introduces a challenge that may lead to a more robust software landscape. If TeamA needs a change in TeamB’s service in order to complete it’s task, some form of planning has to take place. Both teams have to cater for slipping schedules and unforeseen events that cause the delivery date of a feature to change. However, depending on a commitment made by another team is tricky; there are lots of valid reasons why a change may be late (e.g. production issues or illness temporarily reduces a teams capacity or high priority changes take precedence). So TeamA may never depend on TeamB to finish before the deadline. TeamA will learn to protect its weekends and evenings by changing their architecture. Not making assumptions about another teams schedule, in a Microservice environment, will therefore lead to more robust software.

 

[edited: 3 aug 2015 - added preamble and removed line "Today's blog is the last in a series about our Microservices principles."]