Automated deployment of Docker Universal Control Plane with Terraform and Ansible

You got into the Docker Universal Control Plane beta and you are ready to get going, and then you see a list of manual commands to set it up. As you don't want to do anything manually, this guide will help you setup DUCP in a few minutes by using just a couple of variables. If you don't know what DUCP is, you can read the post I made earlier. The setup is based on one controller, and a configurable amount of replicas which will automatically join the controller to form a cluster. There a few requirements we need to address to make this work, like setting the external (public) IP while running the installer and passing the controller's certificate fingerprint to the replicas during setup. We will use Terraform to spin up the instances, and Ansible to provision the instances and let them connect to each other.Read more →

Security is maturing in the Docker ecosystem

Security is probably one of the biggest subjects when it comes to containers. Developers love containers, some ops do as well. But it most of the time boils down to the security aspects of containers. Is it safe to use, what if someone breaks out? The characteristics of containers which we love, could also be a weak spot when it comes to security. In this blog I want to show some common methods to establish a defence in depth around your containers. This is container-specific, so I won't be talking about locking down the host nodes or reducing the attack surface i.e. by disabling Linux daemons.

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Scheduling containers and more with Nomad

Specifically for the Dutch Docker Day on the 20th of November, HashiCorp released version 0.2.0 of Nomad which has some awesome features such as service discovery by integrating with Consul, the system scheduler and restart policies.  HashiCorp worked hard to release version 0.2.0 on 18th of November and we pushed ourselves to release a self-paced, hands-on workshop. If you would like to explore and play with these latest features of Nomad, go check out the workshop over at http://workshops.nauts.io.

In this blog post (or as I experienced it: roller coaster ride), you will catch a glimpse of the work that went into creating the workshop.

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The Sunk Cost Fallacy Fallacy

Imagine two football fans planning to attend a match 60 miles away. One of them paid for a ticket in advance; the other was just about to buy a ticket when he got one from a friend for free. The night of the game, a blizzard hits. Which fan do you think is more likely to drive through a blizzard to see the game?

You probably (correctly) guessed that the fan who paid for his ticket is more likely to drive through the blizzard. What you may not have realized, though, is that this is an irrational decision, at least economically speaking.

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Docker to the on-premise rescue

During the second day at Dockercon EU 2015 in Barcelona, Docker introduced the missing glue which they call "Containers as a Service Platform". With both focus on public cloud and on-premise, this is a great addition to the eco system. For this blogpost I would like to focus on the Run part of the "Build-Ship-Run" thought of Docker, and with the focus on on-premise. To realize this, Docker launched the Docker Universal Control Plane which was the project formerly known as Orca.

caas-private I got to play with version 0.4.0 of the software during a hands-on lab and I will try to summarize what I've learned.

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Refactoring a monolith to Microservices

For a training on Microservices that is currently under development at Xebia, we've created implementations of a web shop in both a monolithic and Microservices architecture. We then used these examples in a couple of workshops to explain a number of Microservices concepts (see here and here). In this post we will describe the process we followed to move from a monolith to services, and what we learned along the way.
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Making Amazon ECS Container Service as easy to use as Docker run

One of the reasons Docker caught fire was that it was soo easy to use. You could build and start a docker container in a matter of seconds. With Amazon ECS this is not so. You have to learn a whole new lingo (Clusters, Task definitions, Services and Tasks), spin up an ECS cluster, write a nasty looking JSON file or wrestle with a not-so-user-friendly UI before you have your container running in ECS.

In the blog we will show you that Amazon ECS can be as fast, by presenting you a small utility named ecs-docker-run which will allow you to start a Docker container almost as fast as with Docker stand-alone by interpreting the Docker run command line options. Together with a ready-to-run CloudFormation template, you can be up and running with Amazon ECS within minutes!

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Innovation day at KLM: Persistence with Docker containers

On 3th of July KLM and Cargonauts joined forces at KLM headquarters for an innovation day. The goal was to share knowledge and find out how to properly do “Persistence with Docker containers”.

Persistence is data that you want to have available after the reboot, and to make it more complex in some cases you also want to share that data over multiple nodes. Examples of this are an upload folder that is shared or a database. Our innovation day case is focusing on a MySQL database, we want to find out how we can host MySQL data reliable and highly available.

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The monolithic frontend in the microservices architecture

When you are implementing a microservices architecture you want to keep services small. This should also apply to the frontend. If you don't, you will only reap the benefits of microservices for the backend services. An easy solution is to split your application up into separate frontends. When you have a big monolithic frontend that can’t be split up easily, you have to think about making it smaller. You can decompose the frontend into separate components independently developed by different teams.

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