Monitoring a Kubernetes Environment

This post is part 3 in a 4-part series about Container Monitoring. Post 1 dives into some of the new challenges containers and microservices create and the information you should focus on. Post 2 describes how you can monitor your Mesos cluster. This article describes the challenges of monitoring Kubernetes, how it works and what this means for your monitoring strategy.
 
What is Kubernetes?
Kubernetes is a powerful orchestration system, developed by Google, for managing containerized applications in a (private) cloud environment. Kubernetes is able to automate the deployment, management and scaling of containerized applications and services. Kubernetes provides the infrastructure to build a truly container-centric development and operations environment.

Monitor Your Mesos Cluster with StackState

This post is part 2 in a 4-part series about Container Monitoring. Post 1 dives into some of the new challenges containers and microservices create and the information you should focus on. This article describes how to monitor your Mesos cluster.

Apache Mesos is a distributed systems kernel at the heart of the Mesosphere DC/OS and is designed for operations at very large scale. It abstracts the entire data center into a single pool of computing resources, simplifying running distributed systems at scale. Mesos supports different types of workloads to build a truly modern application. These distributed workloads include container orchestration (like Mesos containers, Docker and Kubernetes), analytics (Spark), big data technologies (Kafka and Cassandra) and much more.

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Docker container secrets on AWS ECS

Almost every application needs some kind of a secret or secrets to do it's work. There are all kind of ways to provide this to the containers but it all comes down to the following five:

  1. Save the secrets inside the image
  2. Provide the secrets trough ENV variables
  3. Provide the secrets trough volume mounts
  4. Use a secrets encryption file
  5. Use a secrets store

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The Container Monitoring Problem

This post is part 1 in a 4-part series about Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos monitoring. This article dives into some of the new challenges containers and microservices create and the metrics you should focus on.

Containers are a solution to the problem of how to get software to run reliably when moved from one environment to another. It’s a lightweight virtual machine with a purpose to provide software isolation.

So why are containers such a big deal?

Containers simply make it easier for developers and operators to know that their software will run, no matter where it is deployed. We see companies moving from physical machines, to virtual machines and now to containers. This shift in architecture looks very promising, but in reality you might introduce problems you didn’t see coming.

Read the full article on http://blog.stackstate.com/the-container-monitoring-problem

Deep dive into Windows Server Containers and Docker – Part 2 – Underlying implementation of Windows Server Containers

With the introduction of Windows Server 2016 Technical Preview 3 in August 2015, Microsoft enabled the container technology on the Windows platform. While Linux had its container technology since August 2008 such functionality was not supported on Microsoft operating systems before. Thanks to the success of Docker on Linux, Microsoft decided almost 3 years ago to start working on a container implementation for Windows. Since September 2016 we are able to work with a public released version of this new container technology in Windows Server 2016 and Windows 10. But what is the difference between containers and VMs? And how are Windows containers implemented internally within the Windows architecture? In this blogpost we’ll dive into the underlying implementation of containers on Windows.

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Fixing “HNS failed with error : Unspecified error” on docker-compose for Windows

The past few days I worked quite a lot with docker-compose on my windows machine and after something strange happened to my machine that crashed it, I was not able to start any containers anymore that had connectivity over the network with each other.

Every time I used the command-line docker-compose up, I would get a message telling me it failed to start the container. the full message I got was:

“ERROR: for web  Cannot start service web: failed to create endpoint aspnetblogapplication_web_1 on network nat: HNS failed with error : Unspecified error”

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Created an open source VSTS build & release task for Azure Web App Virtual File System

I’ve created a new VSTS Build & Release task to help you interact with the (VFS) Virtual File System API (Part of KUDU API of your Azure Web App). Currently this task can only be used to delete specific files or directories from the web app during your build or release workflow. It will be updated in the near future to also be able to list files or to upload / download files through the VFS API

The reason i made this task was that i needed it at my current customer. We’re deploying our custom solution to a Sitecore website running on Azure web apps using MSDeploy. The deployment consists of 2 parts: an install of the out-of-the-box Sitecore installation and the deployment of our customisations. When deploying new versions we want to keep the Sitecore installation and MSDeploy will update most of our customisations. Some customisations however create artifacts that stay on the server and aren’t  in control of the MSDeploy package that can cause errors on our web application. This new VSTS Build / Release task can help you delete these files. In the future this task will be updated with other functionality of the VFS API such as listing, uploading or downloading files.

The task is available in the VSTS Marketplace and is open source on github.

Let’s have a look how to use this task and how it works under the hood.
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Top 5 Ingredients for developing Cloud Native Applications

Introduction

Cloud Native Applications is a trend in IT that promises to develop and deploy applications at scale fast and cost-efficient by leveraging cloud services to get run-time platform capabilities such as performance, scalability and security out of the box. Teams are able to focus on delivering functionality to increase the pace of innovation.  Everything aimed to stay ahead of the competition. Companies such as Netflix and Uber disrupt their markets by leveraging cloud native capabilities to quickly introduce their products at a global scale. Adapt or die.

This article serves as the start of a serie of articles. The goal of this initial article is to explain the why and how of cloud native applications by defining the top 5 ingredients and their rationale. In follow-up articles, I will explain the ingredients in more detail.Read more →

Building, testing and deploying precompiled Azure Functions

Azure functions are great to build small specialized services really fast. When you create an Azure Functions project by using the built-in template from the SDK in Visual Studio you’ll automatically get a function made in a CSX file. This looks like plain old C# but in fact it is actually  is C# Script. When you’re deploying these files to Azure you don’t have to compile them locally or on a build server but you can just upload them to your Azure Storage directly.

In the last update for Azure Functions the option to build precompiled functions was added. Doing this is actually pretty simple. I’ve created a sample project on Github containing a precompiled Azure function, unit tests for the function and an ARM template to deploy the function. Lets go over the steps to create a precompiled Azure function.

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Understanding serverless cloud and clear

Serverless is considered the containers’ successor. But although it’s promoted heavily, it still isn’t the best fit for every use case. By knowing what its pitfalls and disadvantages are, it becomes quite easy to find the use cases which do fit the pattern. This post gives some technology perspectives on the maturity of serverless today.

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