Agile

Ready, Test, Go!

Viktor Clerc

The full potential of many an agile organization is hardly ever reached. Many teams find themselves redefining user stories although they have been committed to as part of the sprint. The ‘ready phase’, meant to get user stories clear and sufficiently detailed so they can be implemented, is missed. How will each user story result in high quality features that deliver business value? The ‘Definition of Ready’ is lacking one important entry: “Automated tests are available.” Ensuring to have testable and hence automated acceptance criteria before committing to user stories in a sprint, allows you to retain focus during the sprint. We define this as: Ready, Test, Go!

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New daily stand up questions

Daniel Burm

This post provides some alternate standup questions to let your standup be: aimed forward, goal focused, team focused.

The questions are:

  1. What have I achieved since our last SUM?
  2. What is my goal for today?
  3. What things keep me from reaching my goal?
  4. What is our team goal for the end of our sprint day?

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Why 'Why' Is Everything

Pieter Rijken

The 'Why' part is perhaps the most important aspect of a user story. This links to the sprint goal which links ultimately to the product vision and organisation's vision.

Lately, I got reminded of the very truth of this statement.  Read more

Become high performing. By being happy.  

Paul Takken

The summer holidays are over. Fall is coming. Like the start of every new year, a good moment for new inspiration.

Recently, I went twice to the Boston area for a client of Xebia. I met there (I dislike the word “assessments"..) a number of experienced Scrum teams. They had an excellent understanding of Scrum, but were not able to convert this to an excellent performance. Actually, there were somewhat frustrated and their performance was slightly going down.

So, they were great teams, great team members, their agile processes were running smoothly, but still not a single winning team. Which left in my opinion only one option: a lack of Spirit.   Spirit is the fertilizer of Scrum and actually every framework, methodology and innovation.  But how to boost the spirit?
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Continuous Delivery is about removing waste from the Software Delivery Pipeline

Michiel Sens

On October the 22nd I will be speaking at the Continuous Delivery and DevOps Conference in Copenhagen where I will share experiences on a very successful implementation of a new website serving about 20.000.000 page views a month.

Components and content for this site were developed by five(!) different vendors and for this project the customer took the initiative to work according to DevOps principles and implement a fully automated Software Delivery Process as they went along. This was a big win for the project, as development teams could now focus on delivering new software instead of fixing issues within the delivery process itself and I was the lucky one to implement this.

This blog is about visualizing the 'waste' we addressed within the project where you might find the diagrams handy when communicating Continuous Delivery principles within your own organization. Read more

Synchronize the Team

Steven Ottenhoff

How can you, as a scrum master, improve the chances that the scrum team has a common vision and understanding of both the user story and the solution, from the start until the end of the sprint?   

The problem

The planning session is where the team should synchronize on understanding the user story and agree on how to build the solution. But there is no real validation that all the team members are on the same page. The team tends to dive into the technical details quite fast in order to identify and size the tasks. The technical details are often discussed by only a few team members and with little or no functional or business context. Once the team leaves the session, there is no guarantee that they remain synchronized when the sprint progresses. 

The only other team synchronization ritual, prescribed by the scrum process, is the daily scrum or stand-up. In most teams the daily scrum is as short as possible, avoiding semantic discussions. I also prefer the stand-ups to be short and sweet. So how can you or the team determine that the team is (still) synchronized?

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Help! Too Many Incidents! - Capacity Assignment Policy In Agile Teams

Pieter Rijken

As an Agile coach, scrum master, product owner, or team member you probably have been in the situation before in which more work is thrown at the team than the team has capacity to resolve.

In case of work that is already known this basically is a scheduling problem of determining the optimal order that the team will complete the work so as to maximise the business value and outcome. This typically applies to the case that a team is working to build or extend a new product.

The other interesting case is e.g. operational teams that work on items that arrive in an ad hoc way. Examples include production incidents. Work arrives ad hoc and the product owner needs to allocate a certain capacity of the team to certain types of incidents. E.g. should the team work on database related issues, or on front-end related issues?

If the team has more than enough capacity the answer is easy: solve them all! This blog will show how to determine what capacity of the team is best allocated to what type of incident.

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BE Agile before you Become Agile

Daniel Burm

People dislike change. It disrupts our routines and we need to invest to adapt. We only go along if we understand why change is needed and how we benefit from it.
The key to intrinsic motivation is to experience the benefits of the change yourself, rather than having someone else explain it to you.

Agility is almost an acronym for change. It is critical to let people experience the benefits of Agility before asking them to buy into this new way of working. This post explains how to create a great Agile experience in a fun, simple, cost efficient and highly effective way. BEing agile, before BEcoming agile!

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Agile 2014 – speaking and attending; a summary

Jeroen Molenaar

So Agile 2014 is over again… and what an interesting conference it was.

What did I find most rewarding? Meeting so many agile people! My first conclusion was that there were experts like us agile consultants or starting agile coaches, ScrumMasters and other people getting acquainted with our cool agile world. Another trend I noticed was the scaled agile movement. Everybody seems to be involved in that somehow. Some more successful than others; some more true to agile than others.

What I missed this year was the movement of scrum or agile outside IT although my talk about scrum for marketing had a lot of positive responses.  Everybody I talked to was interested in hearing more information about it.

There was a talk maybe even two about hardware agile but I did not found a lot of buzz around it. Maybe next year? I do feel that there is potential here. I believe Fullstack product development should be the future. Marketing and IT teams? Hardware and software teams?  Splitting these still sounds as design and developer teams to me.

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Little's Law in 3D

Pieter Rijken

The much used relation between average cycle time, average total work and input rate (or throughput) is known as Little's Law. It is often used to argue that it is a good thing to work on less items at the same time (as a team or as an individual) and thus lowering the average cycle time. In this blog I will discuss the less known generalisation of Little's Law giving an almost unlimited number of additional relation. The only limit is your imagination.

I will show relations for the average 'Total Operational Cost in the system' and for the average 'Just-in-Timeness'.

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