Agile

A product manager's perfection....

Chris Lukassen

is achieved not there are no more features to add, but when there are no more features to take away. -- Antoine de Saint Exupéry

Not only was Antoine a brilliant writer, philosopher and pilot (well arguably since he crashed in the Mediterranean) but most of all he had a sharp mind about engineering, and I frequent quote him when I train product owners, product managers or in general product companies, about what makes a good product great. I also tell them their most important word in their vocabulary is "no". But the question then becomes, what is the criteria to say "yes"?

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When development resembles the ageing of wine

Chris Lukassen

Once upon a time I was asked to help out a software product company.  The management briefing went something like this: "We need you to increase productivity, the guys in development seem to be unable to ship anything! and if they do ship something it's only a fraction of what we expected".

And so the story begins. Now there are many ways how we can improve the teams outcome and its output (the first matters more), but it always starts with observing what they do today and trying to figure out why.

It turns out that requests from the business were treated like a good wine, and were allowed to "age", in the oak barrel that was called Jira. Not so much to add flavour in the form of details, requirements, designs, non functional requirements or acceptance criteria, but mainly to see if the priority of this request would remain stable over a period of time.

In the days that followed I participated in the "Change Control Board" and saw what he meant. Management would change priorities on the fly and make swift decisions on requirements that would take weeks to implement. To stay in vinotology terms, wine was poured in and out the barrels at such a rate that it bore more resemblance to a blender than to the art of wine making.

Though management was happy to learn I had unearthed to root cause to their problem, they were less pleased to learn that they themselves were responsible.  The Agile world created the Product Owner role for this, and it turned out that this is hat, that can only be worn by a single person.

Once we funnelled all the requests through a single person, both responsible for the success of the product and for the development, we saw a big change. Not only did the business got a reliable sparring partner, but the development team had a single voice when it came to setting the priorities. Once the team starting finishing what they started we started shipping at regular intervals, with features that we all had committed to.

Of course it did not take away the dynamics of the business, but it allowed us to deliver, and become reliable in how and when we responded to change. Perhaps not the most aged wine, but enough to delight our customers and learn what we should put in our barrel for the next round.

 

UC Berkeley paper unveils what business leaders should learn from the Agile WikiSpeed case.

Paul Takken

WIKISPEED_my_next_car_gets_100mpg_1024Last fall, I was approached by Tom van Norden from the UC Berkeley School of Information. A team of professor Morten T. Hansen, famous from his bestseller with Jim CollinsGreat by Choice”, was investigating the magic around Joe Justice’ WikiSpeed. His agile team outperformed companies like Tesla during the XPrize a couple of years ago. Berkeley did research on the Agile and Lean practices being applied by the WikiSpeed team and it’s current status.

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How to make the sprint review meeting worth your while

Daniel Burm

My work allows me to meet a lot of different people, who actively pursue Scrum. Some of them question the value of doing a sprint review meeting at the end of every sprint. Stakeholders presumably do not “use” nor “see” their work directly, or the iterated product is not yet releasable.

Looks like this Scrum ritual is not suited for all. If you are a person questioning the value of a demo, then focus on your stakeholders and start to demo the delta instead of just your product. Here is a 3-step plan to make your sprint reviews worth your while.
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Agile: how hard can it be?!

Chris Lukassen

Yesterday my colleagues and I ran an awesome workshop at the MIT conference in which we built a Rube Goldberg machine using Scrum and Extreme Engineering techniques. As agile coaches one would think that being an Agile team should come naturally to us, but I'd like to share our pitfalls and insights with you since "we learned a lot" about being an agile team and what an incredible powerful model a Rube Goldberg machine is for scaled agile product development.

If you're not the reading type, check out the video.

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Extreme Engineering - Building a Rube Goldberg machine with scrum

Jeroen Molenaar

Is agile usable to do other things than software development? Well we knew that already; yes!
But to create a machine in 1 day with 5 teams and continuously changing members using scrum might be exciting!

See our report below (it's in Dutch for now)

 

Extreme engineering video

 

 

The End of Common-off-the-Shelf Software

Jan Vermeir

Large Common-of-the-Shelf Software (COTS for short) packages are difficult to implement and integrate. Buying a large software package is not a good idea. Below I will explain how Agile methods and services on light weight containers will help implement minimal, focused solutions.
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About snowmen and mathematical proof why agile works

Chris Lukassen

Last week I had an interesting course by Roger Sessions on Snowman Architecture. The perishable nature of Snowmen under any serious form of pressure fortunately does not apply to his architecture principles, but being an agile fundamentalist I noticed some interesting patterns in the math underlying the Snowmen Architecture that are well rooted in agile practices. Understanding these principles may give facts to feed your gut feeling about these philosophies and give mathematical proof as to why Agile works.

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(Edu) Scrum at XP Days Benelux: beware of the next generation

Nicole Belilos

Xp Days Benelux 2014 is over, and it was excellent.
Good sessions, interesting mix of topics and presenters, and a wonderful atmosphere of knowledge sharing, respect and passion for Agile.

After 12 years, XP Days Benelux continues to be inspiring and surprising.

The greatest surprise for me was the participation of 12 high school students from the Valuas College in Venlo, who arrived on the second day. These youngsters did not only attend the conference, but they actually hosted a 120-minute session on Scrum at school, called EduScrum.

eduscrum

 

Eduscrum

EduScrum uses the ceremonies, roles and artifacts of Scrum to help young people learn in a better way. Students work together in small teams, and thus take ownership of their own learning process. At the Valuas College, two enthusiastic Chemistry teachers introduced EduScrum in their department two years ago, and have made the switch to teaching Chemistry in this new way.

In an interactive session, we, the adults, learned from the youngsters how they work and what EduScrum brought them. They showed their (foldable!) Scrum boards, explained how their teams are formed, and what the impact was on their study results. Forcing themselves to speak English, they were open, honest, courageous and admirable.

eduscrum2

 

Learnings

Doing Scrum in school has many similarities with doing Scrum at work. However, there is also a lot we can learn from the youngsters. These are my main takeaways:

- Transition is hard
It took the students some time to get used to working in the new way. At first they thought it was awkward. The transition took about… 4 lessons. That means that these youngsters were up and running with Scrum in 2 weeks (!).

- Inform your stakeholders
When the teachers introduced Scrum, they did not inform their main stakeholders, the parents. Some parents, therefore, were quite worried about this strange thing happening at school. However,  after some explanations, the parents recognised that eduScrum actually helps to prepare their children for today’s society and were happy with the process.

- Results count
In schools more than anywhere else, your results (grades) count. EduScrum students are graded as a team as well as individually. When they transitioned to Scrum the students experienced a drop in their grades at first, maybe due to the greater freedom and responsibility they had to get used to. Soon after, theirs grades got better.

- Compliancy is important
Schools and teachers have to comply with many rules and regulations. The knowledge that needs to get acquired each year is quite fixed. However, with EduScrum the students decide how they will acquire that knowledge.

- Scrum teaches you to cooperate
Not surprisingly, all students said that, next to Chemistry, they now learned to cooperate and communicate better. Because of this teamwork, most students like to work this way. However, this is also the reason a few classmates would like to return to the old, individual, style of learning. Teamwork does not suit everyone.

- Having fun helps you to work better
School (and work) should not be boring, and we work better together when we have some fun too. Therefore, next to a Definition of Done, the student teams also have a Definition of Fun.  :-)

Next generation Scrum

At the conference, the youngsters were surprised to see that so many companies that they know personally (like Bol.com) are actually doing Scrum. ‘I thought this was just something I learned to do in school ‘, one girl said. ‘But now I see that it is being used in so many companies and I will actually be able to use it after school, too.’

Beware of these youngsters. When this generation enters the work force, they will embrace Scrum as the natural way of working. In fact, this generation is going to take Scrum to the next level.

 

 

 

 

Ready, Test, Go!

Viktor Clerc

The full potential of many an agile organization is hardly ever reached. Many teams find themselves redefining user stories although they have been committed to as part of the sprint. The ‘ready phase’, meant to get user stories clear and sufficiently detailed so they can be implemented, is missed. How will each user story result in high quality features that deliver business value? The ‘Definition of Ready’ is lacking one important entry: “Automated tests are available.” Ensuring to have testable and hence automated acceptance criteria before committing to user stories in a sprint, allows you to retain focus during the sprint. We define this as: Ready, Test, Go!

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