Agile

WorldCup 2014 Retrospective: The Magic about Mindset and Leadership

Paul Takken

This weekend preparing this bjohan-cruijff-hollande-1974logpost, I ran into a brilliant quote from Johan Cruijff. At a conference a few years ago for the Dutch local government, he told a great story about a talented blind golfer, Ronald Boef he played golf with.  Despite his handicap, Ronald Boef played his best golf in difficult mental circumstances like playing balls over a big pond or consistent putting. The conclusion of Johan Cruijff: "Ronald doesn’t “see" the problems, he is only focussing on the next target. He thinks from a positive mindset".   I couldn’t agree more.  In my opinion, this is one of the fundamentals behind eXtreme Manufacturing (XM) and the reason why the Dutch team didn’t made it through the WorldCup finals.

Like many consultants, topsport is an inspiring source for me.  Almost every day I show or tell stories from great sport coaches like Marc Lammers or Johan Cruijjff.   Like every major sports event, also this WorldCup in Brasil contained some interesting lessons for me I wanted to share with you.
 Read more

Why Little's Law Works...Always

Pieter Rijken

On the internet there is much information on Little's Law. It is described an explained in many places [Vac]. Recently, the conditions under which it is true got  attention [Ram11]. As will be explained in this blog the conditions under which the law is true are very mild. It will be shown that for teams working on backlog items virtually there are no conditions.

Why does it work? Under what conditions does it hold?

 Read more

Applying Little's Law in Agile Games

Pieter Rijken

Have you ever used Little's Law to explain that lower WiP (work in progress) limits lead to shorter cycle times? Ever tried to illustrate Little's Law in an Agile game and found it doesn't hold? Then read this blog to discover that it is exactly true in Agile games and how it really works.

Some time ago I gave a kanban workshop. Part of the workshop was a game of folding paper airplanes to illustrate flow. To illustrate Little's Law we determined the throughput, cycle time and work in progress. To my surprise the law didn't hold. Not even close. In this blog I want to share the insight into why it does work!

 Read more

How architecture enables kick ass teams (1): replication considered harmful?

Gero Vermaas

At Xebia we regularly have discussions regarding Agile Architecture? What is it? What does it take? How should you organise this? Is it technical or organisational? And much more questions… which I won’t be answering today. What I will do today is kick off a blog series covering subjects that are often part of these heated debates. In general what we strive for with Agile Architecture is an architecture that enables the organisation to keep moving fast and without IT be a limiting factor for realising changes. As you read this series you’ll start noticing one theme coming back over and over again: Autonomy. Sometimes we’ll be focussing on the architecture of systems, sometimes on the architecture of the organisation or teams, but autonomy is the overarching theme. And if you’re familiar with Conways Law it should be no surprise that there is a strong correlation between team and system structure. Having a structure of teams  that is completely different from your system landscape causes friction. We are convinced that striving for optimal team and system autonomy will lead to an organisation which is able to quickly adapt and respond to changes.

The first subject is replication of data, this is more a systems (landscape) issue and less of an organisational issue and definitely not the only one, more posts will follow.

 Read more

How combined Lean- and Agile practices will change the world as we know it

Paul Takken

You might have attended this month at our presentation about eXtreme Manufacturing and the keynote of Nalden last week on XebiCon 2014. There are a few epic takeaways and additions I would like to share with you in this blogpost.

Epic TakeAway #1: The Learn, Unlearn and Relearn Cycle Like Nalden expressed in his inspiring keynote, one of the major things for him to be successful is being able to Learn, Unlearn and Relearn every time again. In my opinion, this will be the key ability for every successful company in the near future.  In fact, this is how nature evolutes: in the end, only the species who are able to adapt to changing circumstances will survive and evolute. This mechanism makes for example, most of the startups fail, but those who will survive, can be extremely disruptive for non-agile organizations.  Best example for this is of course Whatsapp.  Beating up the Telco Industry by almost destroying their whole businessmodel in only a few months. Learn more about disruptive innovation from one of my personal heroes, Harvard Professor Clayton Christensen.

 Read more

How Agile accelerates your business

Daniel Burm

This drawing explains how agility accelerates your business. It is free to use and distribute. Should you have any questions regarding the subjects mentioned, feel free to get in touch.
Dia1

One Change at a Time

Pieter Rijken

One of the twelve Agile principles states "At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behaviour accordingly" [1]. Many Agile teams have retrospectives every two weeks that result in concrete actions that are executed in the next time period (sprint). There are many types of tuning and adjustments that a team can do. Examples are actions that improve the flow of work, automation of tasks, team coorporation.

Is it good habit for retrospectives to focus on the same type of improvement or should the team alter the type of improvements that will be done? In this blog I will look into the effect of multiple consecutive actions that affect the flow of work.

The simulation is inspired by the GetKanban game [2].

 Read more

Organisational Inertia - A Predictor for Success of Agile Transformations? (Part 2)

Pieter Rijken

In part 1 (Organisational Inertia - Part 1) I have focussed on the question: 'Organisational Inertia - What is it?’. This blog addresses the question ‘How do we measure it?’.

I'll start from the definition of Organisational Inertia as defined in part 1. Then connect to existing models of Organisational Inertia and the relation to Agile teams and show how the analog with Physics is used to find a measure for the 'acceleration'. Then I'll combine these elements to provide a way of measuring inertia. Finally I'll provide basic examples.

 Read more

Speedy FitNesse roundtrips during development

Arnout Engelen

FitNesse is an acceptance testing framework. It allows business users, testers and developers to collaborate on executable specifications (for example in BDD style and/or implementing Specification by Example), and allows for testing both the back-end and the front-end. Aside from partly automating acceptance testing and as a tool to help build a common understanding between developers and business users, a selection of the tests from a FitNesse test suite often doubles as a regression test suite.

In contrast to unit tests, FitNesse tests should usually be focused but still test a feature in an  'end-to-end' way.  Read more

Phoney Deadlines are Deadly for Achieving Results

Pieter Rijken

Ever had deadlines that must be met causing short-term decisions to be made? Ever worked over time with your team to meet an important deadline after which the delivered product wasn’t used for a couple of weeks?

I believe we all know these examples where deadlines are imposed on the team for questionable reasons.

Yet, deadlines are part of reality and we have to deal with them. Certainly, there is business value in meeting them but they also have costs. Read more