Agile

Making Agile even more Awesome. By Nature.

Paul Takken

Watching the evening news and it should be no surprise the world around us is increasingly changing and is becoming too complex to fit in a system we as humankind still can control.  We have to learn and adapt much faster solving our epic challenges. The Agile Mindset and methodologies are an important mainstay here. Adding some principles from nature makes it even more awesome.

 Read more

Robot Framework and the keyword-driven approach to test automation - Part 2 of 3

Michael Hallik

In part 1 of our three-part post on the keyword-driven approach, we looked at the position of this approach within the history of test automation frameworks. We elaborated on the differences, similarities and interdependencies between the various types of test automation frameworks. This provided a first impression of the nature and advantages of the keyword-driven approach to test automation.

In this post, we will zoom in on the concept of a 'keyword'.

What are keywords? What is their purpose? And what are the advantages of utilizing keywords in your test automation projects? And are there any disadvantages or risks involved? Read more

Hoe om te gaan met Start-ups

Daniel Burm

Dit is een vraag die regelmatig door mijn hoofd speelt. In ieder geval moeten we stoppen met het continu romantiseren van deze initiatieven en als corporate Nederland nou eens echt mee gaan spelen.

Maar hoe?

Grofweg zijn er twee strategieën als corporate: opkopen of zelf beter doen! Klinkt simpel, maar is toch best wel complex. Waarschijnlijk is de beste strategie om een mix te kiezen van beide, waarbij je maximaal je eigen corporate kracht gebruikt (ja, die heb je), en tegelijkertijd volledig de kracht van start-up innovatie kunt gebruiken.

Deze post verkent de mogelijkheden en je moet vooral verder lezen, als ook jij wilt weten hoe jij de digitalisering van de 21ste eeuw wilt overleven.

 Read more

Backlog ordering done right!

Pieter Rijken

Various methods exist for helping product owners to decide which backlog item to start first. That this pays off to do so (more or less) right has been shown in blogs of Maurits Rijk and Jeff Sutherland.

These approaches to ordering backlog items all assume that items once picked up by the team are finished according to the motto: 'Stop starting, start finishing'. An example of a well-known algorithm for ordering is Weighted Shortest Job First (WSJF).

For items that may be interrupted, this results not in the best scheduling possible. Items that usually are interrupted by other items include story map slices, (large) epics, themes, Marketable Features and possibly more.

In this blog I'll show what scheduling is more optimal and how it works.

 Read more

Demonstration of the Exactness of Little's Law

Pieter Rijken

Day 18

Little's Law is a powerful tool that relates the amount the work a team is doing and the average lead time of each work item. Basically there are two main applications involving either 1) the input rate of work entering the team, or 2) the throughput of work completed.

In previous posts (Applying Little's Law in agile gamesWhy Little's law works...always) I already explained that Little's Law is exact and hardly has any assumptions, other than work entering the team (or system).

This post demonstrates this by calculating Little Law at every project day while playing GetKanban.
 Read more

The Business Support Team Pattern

Pieter Rijken

Lately I've encountered several teams that organize their work using Agile methods and they all exhibit a similar pattern. Teams (or actually the work) having such work patterns I call Business Support Teams. This type of team usually is responsible for operating the application, supporting the business in using the application, and developing new features on top of the (usually third party) application,

The nature of the work may be plannable or highly ad hoc, e.g. production incidents and/or urgent requests from the business. In practice I notice that the more ad hoc type of work the team has to deal with, the more they are struggling with approaches based on a single backlog of work.

In this post I'll show a set-up using boards and agreements that works for these type of teams very nicely.

 Read more

Robot Framework and the keyword-driven approach to test automation - Part 1 of 3

Michael Hallik

Hans Buwalda is generally credited with the introduction of the keyword-driven paradigm of functional test automation, initially calling it the 'action word' approach.

This approach tackled certain fundamental problems pertaining to the efficiency of the process of creating test code (mainly the lack of reuse) and the maintainability, readability and robustness of that code. Problems surrounding these aspects frequently led to failed automation efforts. The keyword-driven framework therefore was (and is) a quantum leap forward, providing a solution to these problems by facilitating the application of modularity, abstraction and other design patterns to the automation code.

Robot Framework (RF) can be regarded as the epitome of this type of automation framework. Our first post on the RF concentrated on the high-level design of the platform. In this second of our three-part series of introductory-level posts, we will take a closer look at what the keyword-driven approach to test automation is all about.

 Read more

Agile, but still really not Agile? What Pipeline Automation can do for you. Part 3.

Michiel Sens

Organizations adopting Agile and teams delivering on a feature-by-feature basis producing business value at the end of every sprint. Quite possibly this is also the case in your organization. But do these features actually reach your customer at the same pace and generate business value straight away? And while we are at it: are you able to actually use feedback from your customer and apply it for use in the very next sprint?

Possibly your answer is “No”, which I see very often. Many companies have adopted the Agile way of working in their lines of business, but for some reason ‘old problems’ just do not seem to go away...

Hence the question:

“Do you fully capitalize on the benefits provided by working in an Agile manner?”

Straight forward Software Delivery Pipeline Automation might help you with that.

 Read more

Bringing Agile to the Next Level

Paul Takken

The Best is Yet to Come written on desert roadI finished my last post with the statement Agile will be applied on a much wider scale in the near future. Within governmental organizations, industry, startups, on a personal level, you name it.  But how?  In my next posts I will deep dive in this exciting story lying in front of us in five steps:

Blogpost/Step I: Creating Awareness & Distributing Agile Knowledge
Change is a chance, not a threat.  Understanding and applying the Agile Mindset and toolsets will help everyone riding the wave of change with more pleasure and success.  This is the main reason why I’ve joined initiatives like Nederland Kantelt, EduScrum, Wikispeed and Delft University’s D.R.E.A.M. Hall.

Blogpost/Step II: Fit Agile for Purpose
The Agile Manifesto was originally written for software.  Lots of variants of the manifesto emerged the last couple of years serving different sectors and products. This is a good thing if the core values of the agile manifesto are respected.

However, agile is not applicable for everything.  For example, Boeing will never apply Scrum directly for producing critical systems.  They’re applying Scrum for less critical parts and R&D processes. For determining the right approach they use the Cynefin framework.  In this post I will explain this framework making it a lot easier where you could apply Agile and where you should be careful.

Blogpost/Step III: Creating a Credible Purpose or “Why”
You can implement a new framework or organization, hire the brightest minds and have loads of capital, in the end it all boils down to real passion and believe. Every purpose should be spot on in hitting the center of the Golden Circle.  But how to create this fontainebleau in spring?

Blogpost/Step IV: Breaking the Status Quo and Igniting Entrepreneurship
Many corporate organizations are busy or have implemented existing frameworks like SAFe or successful Agile models from companies like Netflix and Spotify.  But the culture change which goes with it, is the most important step. How to spark a startup mentality in your organization?  How to create real autonomy?

Compass with needle pointing the word organic. Green and grey tones over beige background, Conceptual illustration for healthy eating and organic farming.Blogpost/Step V: Creating Organic Organizations
Many Agile implementations do not transform organizations in being intrinsically Agile.  To enable this, organizations should evolve organically, like Holacracy.   They will become stronger and stronger by setbacks and uncertain circumstances.  Organic organizations will be more resilient and anti-fragile.  In fact, it’s exactly how nature works.  But how can you work towards this ideal situation?

Dancing with GetKanban (Using POLCA)

Pieter Rijken

Very recently POLCA got some attention on twitter. The potential and application of POLCA to knowledge work I explained in my blog 'Squeeze more out of kanban with POLCA!' [Rij11] of 4 years ago.

In this blog the GetKanban [GetKanban] game is played by following the the initial 'standard' rules for handling Work in Progress (WiP) limits and by changing the rules of the game inspired by POLCA (See [POLCA]).

The results show an equal throughput between POLCA and non-overlapping WiP limits, with smaller inventory size in the case of POLCA way of approaching WiP limits.

 Read more