Agile

Synchronize the Team

Steven Ottenhoff

How can you, as a scrum master, improve the chances that the scrum team has a common vision and understanding of both the user story and the solution, from the start until the end of the sprint?   

The problem

The planning session is where the team should synchronize on understanding the user story and agree on how to build the solution. But there is no real validation that all the team members are on the same page. The team tends to dive into the technical details quite fast in order to identify and size the tasks. The technical details are often discussed by only a few team members and with little or no functional or business context. Once the team leaves the session, there is no guarantee that they remain synchronized when the sprint progresses. 

The only other team synchronization ritual, prescribed by the scrum process, is the daily scrum or stand-up. In most teams the daily scrum is as short as possible, avoiding semantic discussions. I also prefer the stand-ups to be short and sweet. So how can you or the team determine that the team is (still) synchronized?

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Help! Too Many Incidents! - Capacity Assignment Policy In Agile Teams

Pieter Rijken

As an Agile coach, scrum master, product owner, or team member you probably have been in the situation before in which more work is thrown at the team than the team has capacity to resolve.

In case of work that is already known this basically is a scheduling problem of determining the optimal order that the team will complete the work so as to maximise the business value and outcome. This typically applies to the case that a team is working to build or extend a new product.

The other interesting case is e.g. operational teams that work on items that arrive in an ad hoc way. Examples include production incidents. Work arrives ad hoc and the product owner needs to allocate a certain capacity of the team to certain types of incidents. E.g. should the team work on database related issues, or on front-end related issues?

If the team has more than enough capacity the answer is easy: solve them all! This blog will show how to determine what capacity of the team is best allocated to what type of incident.

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BE Agile before you Become Agile

Daniel Burm

People dislike change. It disrupts our routines and we need to invest to adapt. We only go along if we understand why change is needed and how we benefit from it.
The key to intrinsic motivation is to experience the benefits of the change yourself, rather than having someone else explain it to you.

Agility is almost an acronym for change. It is critical to let people experience the benefits of Agility before asking them to buy into this new way of working. This post explains how to create a great Agile experience in a fun, simple, cost efficient and highly effective way. BEing agile, before BEcoming agile!

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Agile 2014 – speaking and attending; a summary

Jeroen Molenaar

So Agile 2014 is over again… and what an interesting conference it was.

What did I find most rewarding? Meeting so many agile people! My first conclusion was that there were experts like us agile consultants or starting agile coaches, ScrumMasters and other people getting acquainted with our cool agile world. Another trend I noticed was the scaled agile movement. Everybody seems to be involved in that somehow. Some more successful than others; some more true to agile than others.

What I missed this year was the movement of scrum or agile outside IT although my talk about scrum for marketing had a lot of positive responses.  Everybody I talked to was interested in hearing more information about it.

There was a talk maybe even two about hardware agile but I did not found a lot of buzz around it. Maybe next year? I do feel that there is potential here. I believe Fullstack product development should be the future. Marketing and IT teams? Hardware and software teams?  Splitting these still sounds as design and developer teams to me.

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Little's Law in 3D

Pieter Rijken

The much used relation between average cycle time, average total work and input rate (or throughput) is known as Little's Law. It is often used to argue that it is a good thing to work on less items at the same time (as a team or as an individual) and thus lowering the average cycle time. In this blog I will discuss the less known generalisation of Little's Law giving an almost unlimited number of additional relation. The only limit is your imagination.

I will show relations for the average 'Total Operational Cost in the system' and for the average 'Just-in-Timeness'.

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A Valuable Sprint Review (a.k.a. Demo): How To

Marnix van Wendel de Joode

A valuable Sprint Review (from now on in this blog referred to as Demo) can be built in three steps. It starts during the Sprint planning session with agreeing on and understanding the user stories on the Sprint backlog. Then, during the Sprint, the team constantly exchanges ideas and results of the realisation of the Story. Finally, during the demo itself, the Product Owner and the rest of the team demo the stories to the stakeholders to display the value delivered and open up for feedback.

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Scrumban

Jan Toebes

Scrum has become THE revolution in the world of software development. The main philosophy behind scrum is accepting that a problem cannot be fully understood or defined at start; scrum has the focus on maximizing the team's ability to deliver quickly and respond to emerging requirements. It came as truly refreshing in the time when projects were ruled by procedure and MS-project planning. Because of scrum:

  1. Projects can deliver what the customer needs, not just what he thought he wanted.
  2. Teams are efficient. They work as a unit to reach a common goal.
  3. We have better project roles (like a product owner and scrum master), ceremonies (like daily stand-ups, grooming) and a scrumboard.

But the central question is: "are we there yet"? And the answer is: "No!". We can optimize scrum by mixing it with kanban, which leads to scrumban.

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Kanban should be the default choice for DevOps teams

Jasper Sonnevelt

We had a successful workshop on DevOpsDays 2014. Our main point was that Kanban should be the default choice for DevOps teams. The presentation can be downloaded here.

DevOpsDays 2014 was a success

On the 19th, 20th & 21st of June 2014 the second edition of DevOpsDays Amsterdam was held in Pakhuis De Zwijger in Amsterdam. This year I was asked to teach a course there on Kanban for DevOps. At the 2013 edition I also gave a presentation about this subject and it was nice to be invited back to this great event.

With the Open Source mindset in mind I teamed up with Maarten Hoppen en Bas van Oudenaarde. Our message: Kanban should be the default choice for DevOps teams. 

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Marketing scrum vs IT scrum - a report published and presented at agile 2014

Jeroen Molenaar

As we know, Scrum is the perfect framework for IT / software development projects to learn, adapt to change and deliver great software of value, faster.

But is Scrum also usable outside of software development? Can we apply similar or maybe even the same principals in other departments in the enterprise?

Yes, we can! And yes there are differences but there are also a lot of similarities.

We (Remco en Me)  successfully implemented Scrum in the marketing departments of two large companies: The ANWB and ING Bank. Both companies are now using Scrum for the development of new campaigns, their full commercial expressions and even at the product development level. They wanted a faster time to market, more ownership, and greater innovation. How did we approach and realized a transition with those goals in the marketing environment? And what are the results?

So when we are not delivering software but other things, how does Scrum change? Well, a great deal actually. The people working in these other departments are, in general, quite different to those in Software Development (and yes more than you would expect). This means coaches or change agents need to take another approach.

Since the people are different, it is possible to go faster or ‘deeper’ in certain areas. Entrepreneurial skills or ambitions are more present in marketing. This gives a sense of ‘act first apologize later’, taking ownership, a higher drive to succeed, and upfront and willing behavior. Scrumming here means thinking more about business goals and KPIs (how to go from department to scrumteam goals for example). After that the fun begins…

I will be speaking about this topic at agile 2014. A great honor offcourse to be standing there. I will also attende the conference and therefor try to post some updates here.

To read more about this topic you can read my publication about marketing scrum. It has the extensive research paper I publisched about this story. Please feel free to give me comments and questions either about agile 2014 or the paper.

 

Enjoy reading the paper:

Marketing scrum vs IT scrum – two marketing case studies who now ‘act first and apologize later'

 

WorldCup 2014 Retrospective: The Magic about Mindset and Leadership

Paul Takken

This weekend preparing this bjohan-cruijff-hollande-1974logpost, I ran into a brilliant quote from Johan Cruijff. At a conference a few years ago for the Dutch local government, he told a great story about a talented blind golfer, Ronald Boef he played golf with.  Despite his handicap, Ronald Boef played his best golf in difficult mental circumstances like playing balls over a big pond or consistent putting. The conclusion of Johan Cruijff: "Ronald doesn’t “see" the problems, he is only focussing on the next target. He thinks from a positive mindset".   I couldn’t agree more.  In my opinion, this is one of the fundamentals behind eXtreme Manufacturing (XM) and the reason why the Dutch team didn’t made it through the WorldCup finals.

Like many consultants, topsport is an inspiring source for me.  Almost every day I show or tell stories from great sport coaches like Marc Lammers or Johan Cruijjff.   Like every major sports event, also this WorldCup in Brasil contained some interesting lessons for me I wanted to share with you.
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