Agile

Agile: how hard can it be?!

Chris Lukassen

Yesterday my colleagues and I ran an awesome workshop at the MIT conference in which we built a Rube Goldberg machine using Scrum and Extreme Engineering techniques. As agile coaches one would think that being an Agile team should come naturally to us, but I'd like to share our pitfalls and insights with you since "we learned a lot" about being an agile team and what an incredible powerful model a Rube Goldberg machine is for scaled agile product development.

If you're not the reading type, check out the video.

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Extreme Engineering - Building a Rube Goldberg machine with scrum

Jeroen Molenaar

Is agile usable to do other things than software development? Well we knew that already; yes!
But to create a machine in 1 day with 5 teams and continuously changing members using scrum might be exciting!

See our report below (it's in Dutch for now)

 

Extreme engineering video

 

 

The End of Common-off-the-Shelf Software

Jan Vermeir

Large Common-of-the-Shelf Software (COTS for short) packages are difficult to implement and integrate. Buying a large software package is not a good idea. Below I will explain how Agile methods and services on light weight containers will help implement minimal, focused solutions.
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About snowmen and mathematical proof why agile works

Chris Lukassen

Last week I had an interesting course by Roger Sessions on Snowman Architecture. The perishable nature of Snowmen under any serious form of pressure fortunately does not apply to his architecture principles, but being an agile fundamentalist I noticed some interesting patterns in the math underlying the Snowmen Architecture that are well rooted in agile practices. Understanding these principles may give facts to feed your gut feeling about these philosophies and give mathematical proof as to why Agile works.

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(Edu) Scrum at XP Days Benelux: beware of the next generation

Nicole Belilos

Xp Days Benelux 2014 is over, and it was excellent.
Good sessions, interesting mix of topics and presenters, and a wonderful atmosphere of knowledge sharing, respect and passion for Agile.

After 12 years, XP Days Benelux continues to be inspiring and surprising.

The greatest surprise for me was the participation of 12 high school students from the Valuas College in Venlo, who arrived on the second day. These youngsters did not only attend the conference, but they actually hosted a 120-minute session on Scrum at school, called EduScrum.

eduscrum

 

Eduscrum

EduScrum uses the ceremonies, roles and artifacts of Scrum to help young people learn in a better way. Students work together in small teams, and thus take ownership of their own learning process. At the Valuas College, two enthusiastic Chemistry teachers introduced EduScrum in their department two years ago, and have made the switch to teaching Chemistry in this new way.

In an interactive session, we, the adults, learned from the youngsters how they work and what EduScrum brought them. They showed their (foldable!) Scrum boards, explained how their teams are formed, and what the impact was on their study results. Forcing themselves to speak English, they were open, honest, courageous and admirable.

eduscrum2

 

Learnings

Doing Scrum in school has many similarities with doing Scrum at work. However, there is also a lot we can learn from the youngsters. These are my main takeaways:

- Transition is hard
It took the students some time to get used to working in the new way. At first they thought it was awkward. The transition took about… 4 lessons. That means that these youngsters were up and running with Scrum in 2 weeks (!).

- Inform your stakeholders
When the teachers introduced Scrum, they did not inform their main stakeholders, the parents. Some parents, therefore, were quite worried about this strange thing happening at school. However,  after some explanations, the parents recognised that eduScrum actually helps to prepare their children for today’s society and were happy with the process.

- Results count
In schools more than anywhere else, your results (grades) count. EduScrum students are graded as a team as well as individually. When they transitioned to Scrum the students experienced a drop in their grades at first, maybe due to the greater freedom and responsibility they had to get used to. Soon after, theirs grades got better.

- Compliancy is important
Schools and teachers have to comply with many rules and regulations. The knowledge that needs to get acquired each year is quite fixed. However, with EduScrum the students decide how they will acquire that knowledge.

- Scrum teaches you to cooperate
Not surprisingly, all students said that, next to Chemistry, they now learned to cooperate and communicate better. Because of this teamwork, most students like to work this way. However, this is also the reason a few classmates would like to return to the old, individual, style of learning. Teamwork does not suit everyone.

- Having fun helps you to work better
School (and work) should not be boring, and we work better together when we have some fun too. Therefore, next to a Definition of Done, the student teams also have a Definition of Fun.  :-)

Next generation Scrum

At the conference, the youngsters were surprised to see that so many companies that they know personally (like Bol.com) are actually doing Scrum. ‘I thought this was just something I learned to do in school ‘, one girl said. ‘But now I see that it is being used in so many companies and I will actually be able to use it after school, too.’

Beware of these youngsters. When this generation enters the work force, they will embrace Scrum as the natural way of working. In fact, this generation is going to take Scrum to the next level.

 

 

 

 

Ready, Test, Go!

Viktor Clerc

The full potential of many an agile organization is hardly ever reached. Many teams find themselves redefining user stories although they have been committed to as part of the sprint. The ‘ready phase’, meant to get user stories clear and sufficiently detailed so they can be implemented, is missed. How will each user story result in high quality features that deliver business value? The ‘Definition of Ready’ is lacking one important entry: “Automated tests are available.” Ensuring to have testable and hence automated acceptance criteria before committing to user stories in a sprint, allows you to retain focus during the sprint. We define this as: Ready, Test, Go!

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New daily stand up questions

Daniel Burm

This post provides some alternate standup questions to let your standup be: aimed forward, goal focused, team focused.

The questions are:

  1. What have I achieved since our last SUM?
  2. What is my goal for today?
  3. What things keep me from reaching my goal?
  4. What is our team goal for the end of our sprint day?

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Why 'Why' Is Everything

Pieter Rijken

The 'Why' part is perhaps the most important aspect of a user story. This links to the sprint goal which links ultimately to the product vision and organisation's vision.

Lately, I got reminded of the very truth of this statement.  Read more

Become high performing. By being happy.  

Paul Takken

The summer holidays are over. Fall is coming. Like the start of every new year, a good moment for new inspiration.

Recently, I went twice to the Boston area for a client of Xebia. I met there (I dislike the word “assessments"..) a number of experienced Scrum teams. They had an excellent understanding of Scrum, but were not able to convert this to an excellent performance. Actually, there were somewhat frustrated and their performance was slightly going down.

So, they were great teams, great team members, their agile processes were running smoothly, but still not a single winning team. Which left in my opinion only one option: a lack of Spirit.   Spirit is the fertilizer of Scrum and actually every framework, methodology and innovation.  But how to boost the spirit?
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Continuous Delivery is about removing waste from the Software Delivery Pipeline

Michiel Sens

On October the 22nd I will be speaking at the Continuous Delivery and DevOps Conference in Copenhagen where I will share experiences on a very successful implementation of a new website serving about 20.000.000 page views a month.

Components and content for this site were developed by five(!) different vendors and for this project the customer took the initiative to work according to DevOps principles and implement a fully automated Software Delivery Process as they went along. This was a big win for the project, as development teams could now focus on delivering new software instead of fixing issues within the delivery process itself and I was the lucky one to implement this.

This blog is about visualizing the 'waste' we addressed within the project where you might find the diagrams handy when communicating Continuous Delivery principles within your own organization. Read more