Mapping biases to testing, Part 1: Introduction

We humans are weird. We think we can produce bug free software. We think we can plan projects. We think we can say “I’ve tested everything”. But how is that possible when we are governed by biases in our thinking? We simply cannot think about everything in advance, although we like to convince ourselves that we can (confirmation bias). 

In his book “Thinking, Fast and Slow”, Daniel Kahneman explains the most common thinking biases and fallacies. I loved the book so much I’ve read it twice and I’ll tell anyone who wants to listen to read it too. For me it is the best book I ever read on testing. That’s right, a book that by itself has nothing to do with testing, taught me most about it. Before I read the book I wasn’t aware of all the biases and fallacies that are out there. Sure, I noticed that projects always finished late and wondered why people were so big on planning when it never happened that way, but I didn’t know why people kept believing in their excel sheets. In that sense, “Thinking, Fast and Slow” was a huge eye opener for me. There are lots of examples in the book that I answered incorrectly, proving that I’m just as gullible as the next person. Read more →

Learning about test automation with Lego

“Hold on, did you say that I can learn about test automation by playing with Lego? Shut up and take my money!” Yes, I am indeed saying that you can. It will cost you a couple hundred Euro’s, because Lego isn’t cheap, especially the Mindstorm EV3 Lego. It turns out that Lego robots eat at a lot of AA batteries, so buy a couple of packs of these as well. On the software side you need to have a computer with a Java development environment and an IDE of your choice (the free edition of IntelliJ IDEA will do). 

“Okay, hold on a second. Why do you need Java? I thought Lego had its own programming language?”. Yes, that’s true. Orginally, Lego provides you with their own visual programming language. I mean, the audience for the EV3 is actually kids, but it will be our little secret. Because Lego is awesome, even for adults. Some hero made a Java library that can communicate with the EV3 hardware, LeJos, so you can do more awesome stuff with it. Another hero dedicated a whole website to his Mindstorm projects, including instructions on how to build them.

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Trying out the Serenity BDD framework; a report

“Serenity, that feeling you know you can trust your tests.” Sounds great, but I was thinking of Firefly first when I heard the name ‘Serenity’. In this case, we are talking about a framework you can use to automate your tests.

The selling points of this framework are that it integrates your acceptance tests (BDD) with reporting and acts like living documentation. It can also integrate with JIRA and all that jazz. Hearing this, I wasn’t ‘wowed’ per se. There are many tools out there that can do that. But Serenity isn’t supporting just one approach. Although it is heavily favouring Webdriver/Selenium, you can also use JBehave, JUnit, Cucumber. That is really nice! 

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