Why microservices fail

Gianna has joined Avidoo Inc., a productivity platform, as a senior software engineer. In a kick-off meeting with the rest of her team, she brings up the subject of microservices and whether the team has adopted them in any way. She immediately gets a strong reaction.
“We have tried adopting microservices, but they don’t work”, Byron offers.
“It became a terrible mess!”, Kary adds.
Gianna blinked her eyes three times expecting some kind of elaboration, but none followed.
After an uncomfortable silence, Gianna asks: “So what happened?”
“At first it was great. Every time we were asked to create something new we had the opportunity to add a service and use whatever languages and frameworks we wanted to experiment with. We exposed REST APIs on systems it needed to collaborate with or worked on their databases directly. But after a while, things started to break more and more often and development slowed to a crawl.”
Gianna sighs. It sounds to her like her team had been building a distributed monolith, while what they had meant to build were microservices.
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Try is free in the Future

Lately I have seen a few developers consistently use a Try inside of a Future in order to make error handling easier. Here I will investigate if this has any merits or whether a Future on it’s own offers enough error handling.
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Peace of mind in a state of overload

This article is meant for knowledge workers that want to be more on top of things and feel secure that they haven’t forgotten about something, freeing their mind for the actual tasks at hand. It especially applies to those that are using or want to use SCRUM, a popular and formalized Agile methodology, in their day to day work.
I got hooked on Agile back in 2005, while working for Db4o, and never looked back since. Improving the process per iteration and having a manageable amount of work per sprint gave me peace of mind and focus, enabling me to deliver the right software solutions to the stakeholders. When I got asked to join a tech startup in 2011 as its CTO I suddenly had a lot more to deal with: hiring and managing staff, managing costs, reporting to the board, applying for subsidies and making sure the books were kept in order. On top of this I still operated as SCRUM Master and technical lead within a SCRUM team.
During this period one of my co-founders introduced me to Getting things done by David Allen. It took him only about 15 minutes to explain the basics and I got started with it straight away.

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