From Search to Checkout without annoying your customers

In the world of e-commerce, customers are becoming increasingly mobile. In The Netherlands, 50% of consumers is shopping on their mobile phone. Among those under 35 years of age mobile purchases is at 65%. Numbers for searching and browsing for a potential purchase is over 70% overall. Converting these visitors into customers is a delicate task. Consumers are still hesitant to make mobile purchases. The challenge lies in optimizing the mobile user experience. Luckily we can use new web technologies to deliver a stellar user experience with instant page transitions. Nowadays we can offer our customers an e-commerce experience that will not alienate or drive them away, but one that they will love.

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Being An Agile Security Officer: Spread Your Knowledge

This is my fifth and last part of my blog series about Being an Agile Officer

In the previous parts I showed how Security Officers can align with the Agile process and let security become a standard considered quality attribute again. Unfortunately many teams not only need to be made aware of security requirements, but also need technical advise and guidance in designing and implementing them. As an Agile Security Officer you therefor need not only to act as a Stakeholder, but also as a Domain Expert for Security.

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Avoiding deeply nested component trees

By passing child components down instead of data you can avoid passing data down through many levels of components. It also makes your components more reusable. Even multibrand components become much easier to build. Overall it is a pattern which improves your frontend code a lot!

The Problem

When building frontends you will pass data from a parent component to a child component. Often the child component renders this data, but not the component passing it along. The child components have different data requirements than your current component.

Then you add a new component, somewhere down your component tree. It has new data requirements, so you have to pass its data through all its parent components. On top of data, it might also need callbacks to provide interactivity. You also pass these through all parent components. You change a lot of files to add new functionality. With all the data passing the readability of your code also decreases. Overall the maintainability of codebase decreases.

Code samples and more at Medium.com

Property-based testing in Java with JUnit-Quickcheck - Part 1: The basics

To be able to show you what Property-based testing (PBT) is, let's start by grasping the concept of a property in programming languages. Since this is a Java tutorial, I will start with Oracle and their definition of a property in their glossary:

Characteristics of an object that users can set, such as the color of a window.

Property is neither a variable/field or a method; it is something in between which is always true in your context. An example is weight in a postal parcel: this always is greater than zero.  In Java the following example implementation would follow:

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Rediscovering testing with Horizon: Zero Dawn

Recently Guerrilla Games launched its newest and first open world game: Horizon: Zero Dawn. This got us thinking. Is game testing any different than testing 'regular' software? Together with Ana Barbuta, QA Manager at Guerrilla Games, we held a Meetup to find the answer to this question. In this blog post, we reflect shortly on how we look at testing in general and how this view fits with what we've learned about testing games.

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Production ready AWS ECS (EC2 Container Service)

Are you looking to run Docker containers on AWS? Or are you looking to use AWS ECS (EC2 Container Service)? Does it need to be production ready?

If so, then speed up your process and be ready today by looking at my GitHub repository on ECS. It contains infrastructure as code with Terraform for a quick production ready setup. But most importantly it contains information on how the infrastructure is setup. It explains why things are done in a certain way and where to watch for. And finally, shows how to do simple but fully automatic deployments.

If you live in the Netherlands then join me at the Open Kitchen: Simplify DevOps with AWS ECS

Refactoring to Microservices – Using a Document as State

In a previous installment of our Microservice refactoring effort, I’ve introduced a ShopManager and a Clerk to implement the shopping process (see this blog). I ended up with a JSON document transferred between services. To make life easy for myself I just parsed all of the document using Spring magic. This time I will discuss the downside of this strategy and show an alternative.

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Why microservices fail

Gianna has joined Avidoo Inc., a productivity platform, as a senior software engineer. In a kick-off meeting with the rest of her team, she brings up the subject of microservices and whether the team has adopted them in any way. She immediately gets a strong reaction.
“We have tried adopting microservices, but they don’t work”, Byron offers.
“It became a terrible mess!”, Kary adds.
Gianna blinked her eyes three times expecting some kind of elaboration, but none followed.
After an uncomfortable silence, Gianna asks: “So what happened?”
“At first it was great. Every time we were asked to create something new we had the opportunity to add a service and use whatever languages and frameworks we wanted to experiment with. We exposed REST APIs on systems it needed to collaborate with or worked on their databases directly. But after a while, things started to break more and more often and development slowed to a crawl.”
Gianna sighs. It sounds to her like her team had been building a distributed monolith, while what they had meant to build were microservices.
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