The Ultimate Tester: Curiosity

Maaike Brinkhof

In 2014 Bill Sempf posted this Tweet:

His message caused a chain reaction of awesome responses from people thinking of all the edge cases in this scenario. Among the most hilarious responses were:

 You can read the rest of the responses here.

This funny example illustrates perfectly how testers think. We think out of the box and don’t assume that some functionality will work because the developer said so and wrote some unit tests. Sure, automation in testing and scripting has its place and use (as we will discover in the next blog in this series), but it seldom proves that the application works as intended as a whole. Automated scripts are usually following a path without feeding the path new data every time. This can give a false sense of security, “we’ve covered this path”, when inputs matter more to find lingering errors.  Read more

How to achieve Ultimate Agility?

Paul Takken

World Business teamwork puzzle piecesIn reaction on the Era of Big Transitions we currently live in, many organizations are reinventing themselves as we speak.  How can we survive?  Or rephrased more positive: How can we turn this threat into a unique chance?

Most organizations start with this journey by redesigning their culture, way of work and organizational structure.  But are these building blocks not too rigid and too slow to change?

In my opinion, we should be seeking for smaller building blocks. For example in nature, the smallest building blocks are atoms. Of course, we can’t go back to atoms for redefining the most ideal building blocks for an Agile Organization. But for now, imagine people in organizations are like molecules forming the organization. Small, but not the smallest.

But as we can observe almost every day, people are often not that agile at all. We love what we have and don’t like change. But is this really true? Is this not just our behavior which makes us feel comfortable?  Do we unconsciously as human beings, somehow share deeper needs and values and different types of interaction? Referring to nature’s metaphor again: where are our atoms, our smallest building blocks?

This question challenged my mind for quite a while. Until last month.  As Agile Coaches we went on a Aikido Ki Workshop to experience the physical and mental side of resistance and cooperation.

In Japanese martial art, this Material Energy or Life Force is called “Ki”.  By respecting and connecting with the “Ki” of another person, you will be able to take away the resistance of the opponent.   I’ll bet, this all will sound hazy to the most of you, but it’s actually quite easy to experience.

What to do with this almost spiritual blogpost?

As long as we focus primarily on our personal interest, we will never achieve the purest form of Agility and cooperation. We’re on earth as one collective organism, whether we like it or not, all with one goal: making this world a bit better iteratively.  By Learning, Inspecting and Adapting. Together.  This is where our evolution (read: agile) is all about.

It’s like creating an Internet of People.  It all starts with making real connection with the people around us.  Somehow that’s where it becomes very hard for most Western minds. On the other hand, it’s so logical for us we should create an Internet of Things as the next big step for our prosperity. Food for Thought. Don’t you think?

Generic JS Android API wrapper for React Native

Albert Brand

During a React Native project for one of our clients we added some custom Android and iOS libraries to our code and wanted to call a few exposed methods. In such a case, React Native requires you to write a wrapper class to call those public APIs. It was a small boilerplate nuisance and these wrappers would be unnecessary if we made a generic method call bridging API. Also, using such an API wrapper you can call any (obscure) available Android API that is not wrapped yet. Let's see how far we can get!

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The Product Samurai Strategy Canvas

Chris Lukassen

"May you live in interesting times" said Feng Menglong in 1627, and it's never been a more fitting expression than today. With companies leapfrogging in the age of disruption to change the way they work and the business models that they use. Scrum has brought us autonomous hyper productive teams that can quadruple your output, but how do you as a leader know what they are doing? and how do they know what strategy you want them to follow?

In this blog I will talk about the Product Samurai Strategy Canvas. An easy to use tool to discover if your autonomous teams are working towards your strategy or if they are moving in random directions. For it is our purpose to lead our teams like the Samurai. Read more

Solving Agile portfolio planning for Lawns 'R' Us

Daniel Burm

Agile portfolio planning is a great (chief) product owner tool to plan and trace initiatives across various teams. Implementing it can be difficult and cumbersome at times. This post explores the number one critical success factor to do Agile portfolio planning right; Outcome oriented decision making.
Outcome goals are valuable for streamlining your Agile portfolio planning and engaging people involved. Having them clear, enables you to judge all initiatives and ideas based on their contribution to these goals. This creates focus and clarity. For product owners this means it will be easier to explain to others where and when people will work on certain ideas, as well as saying no to the irrelevant ones. Simple two by two frameworks can help you clarify the details and course of action, be it directly product related or impacting you from the side-lines.
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Testing Promises with Mocha

wvenema@xebia.com

If you test Javascript promises with Mocha, there are several styles you can use to write your tests. If you follow the Mocha docs on testing asynchronous code you risk writing 'evergreen' tests. Evergreen tests never fail, even if your code is broken. That is something you clearly do not want to happen. So what is the safest way to write asynchronous tests with Mocha?
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Experimenteren kun je leren

Jasper Sonnevelt

pdcaValidated learning: het leren door een initieel idee uit te voeren en daarna de resultaten te meten. Deze manier van experimenteren is de primaire filosofie achter Lean Startup en veel van het Agile gedachtegoed zoals het op dit moment wordt toegepast.

In wendbare organisaties moet je experimenteren om te kunnen voldoen aan de veranderende markt behoefte. Een goed experiment kan ongelooflijk waardevol zijn, mits goed uitgevoerd. En hier zit meteen een veel voorkomend probleem: het experiment wordt niet goed afgerond. Er wordt wel een proef gedaan, maar daar zit vaak geen goede hypothese achter en de lessen worden niet of nauwelijks meegenomen. Ik heb gemerkt dat, om een hoger lerend vermogen in de organisatie te krijgen, het handig om een vaste structuur aan te houden voor experimenten.

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The Ultimate Tester: Value Creation

Maaike Brinkhof

rsz_value_creation3

Once upon a time, when project managers still thought that building software was a completely manageable and predictable activity, and testers were put in a seperate team to ensure independence, the result was shitty software and frustrated people. Even though the rise of the agile way of working has improved some aspects of software development, the journey will never end. We still have a lot of work to do. Creating good software starts with the people making it, the team. As an agile tester, a tester 3.0 if you will, you are a frontrunner of this paradigm change. 

No longer do you have to sit in a seperate team, crunching requirements to make test scripts that you then manually execute, pretending to be a human computer (how silly is that!). No longer do you have to fake your belief in a Master Test Plan that your test manager urges you to honour. No longer do you have to put your defects in a defect management tool, and then wait for a couple of releases for your findings to be solved.

It is time to take matters in your own hands. It is time to start creating value from the start. Read more

Five leaderships lessons from the Samurai for Product Managers

Chris Lukassen

We have covered several topics in the Product Samurai series that should make you a better product manager. But what if you are leading product management or run innovation within your enterprise? Here are five leadership lessons that make your team better.

“New eras don't come about because of swords, they're created by the people who wield them. ” ― Nobuhiro Watsuki
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The Ultimate Tester

Maaike Brinkhof

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