Don't Build That Product

Chris Lukassen

At the Agile Chef Conference I facilitated a workshop where participants could experience how Aikido can be used to resolve conflicts on the work floor as well by applying verbal Aikido. At the end of the session someone asked me to demonstrate the best defence against a sword attack; I responded by turning around and running as fast as I could.

So how is that in Product Management? what ideas are ideas you should really run away from?

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Matching strings in Scala

Arnout Engelen

Over December I had a lot of fun doing the Advent of Code coding challenges with some colleagues.

Many of those, such as day 21, require interpreting some kind of string input. While normally I'd probably marshall those strings into case classes before processing, in this case that seemed like overkill: a quick pattern-match should be sufficient.

It turns out there's a couple of ways to approach that, which is also a good excuse to look under the hood and see which Scala concepts they're built on.

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A Guide to Generating Boring Code with Node

wvenema@xebia.com

Writing boring code is not fun. Especially if that code is just a derivative of some data. You should generate it instead! A great example is to generate your HTTP client code from an API definition. This is actually very easy to do with a recent node version and requires almost no extra dependencies. In this post I will show you how to take a JSON schema definition and generate some validation logic from that.

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The Best New Years Resolution: Agile Product Management

Chris Lukassen

Agile Product Management is grounded in the Jobs to be done theory and Lean startup principles. In my book “The Product Samurai” I described how you can effectively apply these techniques to be a better Product Manager, but what I didn’t’ cover was why not everybody is doing this already?

Making up for that, and unveiling the seed conditions for the next level of Product Management, I am pleased to give you the best new years resolution: Agile Product Management

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Being An Agile Security Officer: Security Stakeholdership mindset

Dave van Stein

This is the second part in my blog series about 'being an agile security officer'. In this blog I will focus on the mindset of security stakeholdership in Agile and DevOps environments.

In the Agile world the Product Owner is the person who translates business and customer desires into work items (user stories) for the teams. The actual desires and requirements however are provided by stakeholders. Stakeholders are usually representatives of the business and end-users; in the new world security officers should start taking up the role of security stakeholders. The Product Owner usually has multiple stakeholders to take into consideration. As a security stakeholder you have to 'compete' with other stakeholders for the most valuable changes. It has become, more than ever, important to be able to translate your requirements into actual value.

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Will Agile be trashed?

Paul Takken

treeAgile is hot. Almost every Fortune 500 company is “Doing the Agile Thing”. But with the success also the critics are growing rapidly. The post “Agile is Dead” from Matthew Kern was extremely popular. Many of his arguments are dead right. For example, Agile has become a brand name and a hype and the original Agile Manifesto has lost most of his power and purpose by bad interpretations of it.  But there is a lot more to add to this discussion which is often based on misinterpretations what Agile actually means.

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An alternative AngularJS test runner

Freek Wielstra

When building an Angular application, we usually stick to the suggested or auto-generated solution of unit testing; the Karma test runner and server, the Jasmine testing framework, and PhantomJS as the environment to run it all in.

In this blog post I'll explain how this is rather silly, and will provide an alternative and lightweight approach to writing and running unit tests. It will depend on having a certain way of defining your Angular components, and may not be a full 1:1 drop-in replacement, but I can say with a certainty that it'll make your tests faster, the overhead of running them a lot smaller, and improve the quality of tests by having less to worry about.

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The Customer Pain Map

Chris Lukassen
Customer Pain

Customer Pain

“Ouch, that really hurt.” “What was it?” my sparring partner replied. “The choke or the overstretching of the elbow joint?” “The quick throw, I had no time for proper fall breaking.” I replied.

It happens in our sport, we try and experiment and try to find the best way to perform a technique. The goal is not to inflict pain but to figure out what works and what not. Knowing where the pain is and whether it affects the recipient is important beyond jujutsu and in fact is the core of Product Management.

Let’s look at a handy visualization of customer pain to help Product Owners and Product Managers to prioritize.

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Linking Animations to Scroll Position in React Native

Albert Brand

When you want to link a custom animation to the scroll position in a ScrollView, like in the card example below, you are in for some bad performance on low end devices. Let’s figure out why and learn how to make it buttery smooth.

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example animation

Microservices, not so much news after all?

Jan Vermeir

A while ago at Xebia we tried to streamline our microservices effort. In a kick-off session, we got quite badly side tracked (as is often the case) by a meta discussion about what would be the appropriate context and process to develop microservices. After an hour of back-and-forth, we reached consensus that might be helpful to place a topic like microservices in a larger perspective. Below I’ll summarize my views on how to design robust microservices: start with the bigger picture, take time designing a solution, then code your services.

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