Agile: how hard can it be?!

Chris Lukassen

Yesterday my colleagues and I ran an awesome workshop at the MIT conference in which we built a Rube Goldberg machine using Scrum and Extreme Engineering techniques. As agile coaches one would think that being an Agile team should come naturally to us, but I'd like to share our pitfalls and insights with you since "we learned a lot" about being an agile team and what an incredible powerful model a Rube Goldberg machine is for scaled agile product development.

If you're not the reading type, check out the video.

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Extreme Engineering - Building a Rube Goldberg machine with scrum

Jeroen Molenaar

Is agile usable to do other things than software development? Well we knew that already; yes!
But to create a machine in 1 day with 5 teams and continuously changing members using scrum might be exciting!

See our report below (it's in Dutch for now)

 

Extreme engineering video

 

 

The End of Common-off-the-Shelf Software

Jan Vermeir

Large Common-of-the-Shelf Software (COTS for short) packages are difficult to implement and integrate. Buying a large software package is not a good idea. Below I will explain how Agile methods and services on light weight containers will help implement minimal, focused solutions.
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Testing Feature Branches Remotely with Grunt

Misja Alma

At my current job we are working on multiple features simultaneously, using git feature branches. We have a Jenkins build server which we use for integration testing of the master branch, which runs about 20 jobs simultaneously for Protractor and Fitnesse tests. An individual job typically takes around 10 minutes to complete.

Our policy is to keep the master branch production ready at all times. Therefore we have a review process in place that should assure that feature branches are only pushed to master when they can't break the application.
This all works very well as long as the feature which you are working on requires only one or two integration test suites to test its functionality. But every once in a while you're working on something that could have effects all over the application, and you would like to run a larger number of integration test suites. And of course before you merge your feature branch to master.
Running all the integration suites on your local machine would take too way much time. And Jenkins is configured to run all its suites against the master branch. So what to do?
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About snowmen and mathematical proof why agile works

Chris Lukassen

Last week I had an interesting course by Roger Sessions on Snowman Architecture. The perishable nature of Snowmen under any serious form of pressure fortunately does not apply to his architecture principles, but being an agile fundamentalist I noticed some interesting patterns in the math underlying the Snowmen Architecture that are well rooted in agile practices. Understanding these principles may give facts to feed your gut feeling about these philosophies and give mathematical proof as to why Agile works.

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(Edu) Scrum at XP Days Benelux: beware of the next generation

Nicole Belilos

Xp Days Benelux 2014 is over, and it was excellent.
Good sessions, interesting mix of topics and presenters, and a wonderful atmosphere of knowledge sharing, respect and passion for Agile.

After 12 years, XP Days Benelux continues to be inspiring and surprising.

The greatest surprise for me was the participation of 12 high school students from the Valuas College in Venlo, who arrived on the second day. These youngsters did not only attend the conference, but they actually hosted a 120-minute session on Scrum at school, called EduScrum.

eduscrum

 

Eduscrum

EduScrum uses the ceremonies, roles and artifacts of Scrum to help young people learn in a better way. Students work together in small teams, and thus take ownership of their own learning process. At the Valuas College, two enthusiastic Chemistry teachers introduced EduScrum in their department two years ago, and have made the switch to teaching Chemistry in this new way.

In an interactive session, we, the adults, learned from the youngsters how they work and what EduScrum brought them. They showed their (foldable!) Scrum boards, explained how their teams are formed, and what the impact was on their study results. Forcing themselves to speak English, they were open, honest, courageous and admirable.

eduscrum2

 

Learnings

Doing Scrum in school has many similarities with doing Scrum at work. However, there is also a lot we can learn from the youngsters. These are my main takeaways:

- Transition is hard
It took the students some time to get used to working in the new way. At first they thought it was awkward. The transition took about… 4 lessons. That means that these youngsters were up and running with Scrum in 2 weeks (!).

- Inform your stakeholders
When the teachers introduced Scrum, they did not inform their main stakeholders, the parents. Some parents, therefore, were quite worried about this strange thing happening at school. However,  after some explanations, the parents recognised that eduScrum actually helps to prepare their children for today’s society and were happy with the process.

- Results count
In schools more than anywhere else, your results (grades) count. EduScrum students are graded as a team as well as individually. When they transitioned to Scrum the students experienced a drop in their grades at first, maybe due to the greater freedom and responsibility they had to get used to. Soon after, theirs grades got better.

- Compliancy is important
Schools and teachers have to comply with many rules and regulations. The knowledge that needs to get acquired each year is quite fixed. However, with EduScrum the students decide how they will acquire that knowledge.

- Scrum teaches you to cooperate
Not surprisingly, all students said that, next to Chemistry, they now learned to cooperate and communicate better. Because of this teamwork, most students like to work this way. However, this is also the reason a few classmates would like to return to the old, individual, style of learning. Teamwork does not suit everyone.

- Having fun helps you to work better
School (and work) should not be boring, and we work better together when we have some fun too. Therefore, next to a Definition of Done, the student teams also have a Definition of Fun.  :-)

Next generation Scrum

At the conference, the youngsters were surprised to see that so many companies that they know personally (like Bol.com) are actually doing Scrum. ‘I thought this was just something I learned to do in school ‘, one girl said. ‘But now I see that it is being used in so many companies and I will actually be able to use it after school, too.’

Beware of these youngsters. When this generation enters the work force, they will embrace Scrum as the natural way of working. In fact, this generation is going to take Scrum to the next level.

 

 

 

 

How to implement validation callbacks in AngularJS 1.3

Marc Rooding

In my current project we've recently switched from AngularJS 1.2 to 1.3. Except for a few breaking changes the upgrade was quite trivial. However, after diving into the changelog we noticed that the way AngularJS handles form validation changed drastically. Since we're working on a greenfield application we decided it was worth the effort to rewrite the validation logic. The main argument for this was that the validation we had could be drastically simplified by using the new validation pipeline.

This article is aimed at AngularJS developers interested in the new validation pipeline offered by AngularJS 1.3. Except for a small introduction, this article will not be about all the different aspects related to validating forms. I will showcase 2 different cases in which we had to come up with custom solutions:

  • Displaying additional information after successful validation
  • Validating equality of multiple password fields

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CITCON Europe 2014 wrap-up

Arjan Molenaar

On the 19th and 20th of September CITCON (pronounced "kit-con") took place in Zagreb, Croatia. CITCON is dedicated to continuous integration and testing. It brings together some of the most interesting people of the European testing and continuous integration community. These people also determine the topics of the conference.

They can do this because CITCON is an Open Space conference. If you're not familiar with the concept of Open Space, check out Wikipedia. On Friday evening, attendees can pitch their proposals. Through dot voting and (constant) shuffling of the schedule, the attendees create their conference program.

In this post we'll wrap up a few topics that were discussed.

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Testing cheatsheet

Jan Toebes

Sometimes it is not clear for everybody how unit tests relates to e2e-test. This cheatsheet, I created, describes in one page:

  1. The different definitions
  2. Different structures of the tests
  3. The importance of unit tests
  4. The importance of e2e tests
  5. External versus internal quality
  6. E2E and unit tests living next to each other

Feel free to download and use it in your project if you feel there is a confusion of tongues between unit and e2e tests.

Download: TestingCheatSheet

 

Ready, Test, Go!

Viktor Clerc

The full potential of many an agile organization is hardly ever reached. Many teams find themselves redefining user stories although they have been committed to as part of the sprint. The ‘ready phase’, meant to get user stories clear and sufficiently detailed so they can be implemented, is missed. How will each user story result in high quality features that deliver business value? The ‘Definition of Ready’ is lacking one important entry: “Automated tests are available.” Ensuring to have testable and hence automated acceptance criteria before committing to user stories in a sprint, allows you to retain focus during the sprint. We define this as: Ready, Test, Go!

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