Exploring container platforms: StackEngine

Bas Tichelaar

Docker has been around for more than a year already, and there are a lot of container platforms popping up. In this series of blogposts I will explore these platforms and share some insights. This blogpost is about StackEngine.

TL;DR: StackEngine is (for now) just a nice frontend to the Docker binary. Nothing...

Try, Option or Either?

Remco Beckers

Scala has a lot of different options for handling and reporting errors, which can make it hard to decide which one is best suited for your situation. In Scala and functional programming languages it is common to make the errors that can occur explicit in the functions signature (i.e. return type), in contrast with the common practice in other programming languages where either special values are used (-1 for a failed lookup anyone?) or an exception is thrown.

Let's go through the main options you have as a Scala developer and see when to use what!

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Cancelling $http requests for fun and profit

Albert Brand

At my current client, we have a large AngularJS application that is configured to show a full-page error whenever one of the $http requests ends up in error. This is implemented with an error interceptor as you would expect it to be. However, we’re also using some calculation-intense resources that happen to timeout once in a while. This combination is tricky: a user triggers a resource request when navigating to a certain page, navigates to a second page and suddenly ends up with an error message, as the request from the first page triggered a timeout error. This is a particular unpleasant side effect that I’m going to address in a generic way in this post.

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When development resembles the ageing of wine

Chris Lukassen

Once upon a time I was asked to help out a software product company.  The management briefing went something like this: "We need you to increase productivity, the guys in development seem to be unable to ship anything! and if they do ship something it's only a fraction of what we expected".

And so the story begins. Now there are many ways how we can improve the teams outcome and its output (the first matters more), but it always starts with observing what they do today and trying to figure out why.

It turns out that requests from the business were treated like a good wine, and were allowed to "age", in the oak barrel that was called Jira. Not so much to add flavour in the form of details, requirements, designs, non functional requirements or acceptance criteria, but mainly to see if the priority of this request would remain stable over a period of time.

In the days that followed I participated in the "Change Control Board" and saw what he meant. Management would change priorities on the fly and make swift decisions on requirements that would take weeks to implement. To stay in vinotology terms, wine was poured in and out the barrels at such a rate that it bore more resemblance to a blender than to the art of wine making.

Though management was happy to learn I had unearthed to root cause to their problem, they were less pleased to learn that they themselves were responsible.  The Agile world created the Product Owner role for this, and it turned out that this is hat, that can only be worn by a single person.

Once we funnelled all the requests through a single person, both responsible for the success of the product and for the development, we saw a big change. Not only did the business got a reliable sparring partner, but the development team had a single voice when it came to setting the priorities. Once the team starting finishing what they started we started shipping at regular intervals, with features that we all had committed to.

Of course it did not take away the dynamics of the business, but it allowed us to deliver, and become reliable in how and when we responded to change. Perhaps not the most aged wine, but enough to delight our customers and learn what we should put in our barrel for the next round.

 

UC Berkeley paper unveils what business leaders should learn from the Agile WikiSpeed case.

Paul Takken

WIKISPEED_my_next_car_gets_100mpg_1024Last fall, I was approached by Tom van Norden from the UC Berkeley School of Information. A team of professor Morten T. Hansen, famous from his bestseller with Jim CollinsGreat by Choice”, was investigating the magic around Joe Justice’ WikiSpeed. His agile team outperformed companies like Tesla during the XPrize a couple of years ago. Berkeley did research on the Agile and Lean practices being applied by the WikiSpeed team and it’s current status.

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Microservices versus the common SOA implementation

Coert van den Thillart

When I was first reading about MSA architectures (MSA) I had a hard time figuring out what was so different from a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Main reason for this is that the SOA paradigm leaves quite a bit of room for interpretation and various people have different interpretations. When Martin Fowler wrote about MSA almost a year ago he also mentioned that some people see it as “SOA done right”, he himself considers MSA a subset of SOA. So, what are the differences, if any? Read more

Apache Spark

Jan Toebes

Spark is the new kid on the block when it comes to big data processing. Hadoop is also an open-source cluster computing framework, but when compared to the community contribution, Spark is much more popular. How come? What is so special and innovative about Spark? Is it that Spark makes big data processing easy and much more accessible to the developer? Or is it because the performance is outstanding, especially compared to Hadoop?

This article gives an introduction to the advantages of current systems and compares these two big data systems in depth in order to explain the power of Spark.

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How to make the sprint review meeting worth your while

Daniel Burm

My work allows me to meet a lot of different people, who actively pursue Scrum. Some of them question the value of doing a sprint review meeting at the end of every sprint. Stakeholders presumably do not “use” nor “see” their work directly, or the iterated product is not yet releasable.

Looks like this Scrum ritual is not suited for all. If you are a person questioning the value of a demo, then focus on your stakeholders and start to demo the delta instead of just your product. Here is a 3-step plan to make your sprint reviews worth your while.
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Run your iOS app without overwriting the App Store version

Lammert Westerhoff

Sometimes when you're developing a new version of your iOS app, you'd like to run it on your iPhone or iPad and still be able to run the current version that is released on the App Store. Normally when you run your app from Xcode on your device, it will overwrite any existing version. If you then want to switch back to the version from the App Store, you'll have to delete the development version and download it again from the App Store.

In this blog post I'll describe how you can run a test version of your app next to your production version. This method also works when you have embedded extensions (like the Today Widget or WatchKit app) in your app or when you want to beta test your app with Apple's TestFlight.

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Continuous Delivery across multiple providers

Coert van den Thillart

Over the last year three of the four customers I worked with had a similar challenge with their environments. In different variations they all had their environments setup across separate domains. Ranging from physically separated on-premise networks to having environments running across different hosting providers managed by different parties. Read more