Scheduling containers and more with Nomad

Erik Veld

Specifically for the Dutch Docker Day on the 20th of November, HashiCorp released version 0.2.0 of Nomad which has some awesome features such as service discovery by integrating with Consul, the system scheduler and restart policies.  HashiCorp worked hard to release version 0.2.0 on 18th of November and we pushed ourselves to release a self-paced, hands-on workshop. If you would like to explore and play with these latest features of Nomad, go check out the workshop over at

In this blog post (or as I experienced it: roller coaster ride), you will catch a glimpse of the work that went into creating the workshop.

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Example Mapping - Steering the conversation

Kishen Simbhoedatpanday

People who are familiar with BDD and ATDD already know how useful the three amigos (product owner, tester and developer) session is for talking about what the system under development is supposed to do. But somehow these refinement sessions seem to drain the group's energy. One of the problems I see is not having a clear structure for conversations.

Example Mapping is a simple technique that can steer the conversation into breaking down any product backlog items within 30 minutes.

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Add ifPresent to Swift Optionals

Lammert Westerhoff

In my previous post I wrote a lot about how you can use the map and flatMap functions of Swift Optionals. In this one, I'll add a custom function to Optionals through an extension, the ifPresent function.

extension Optional {

    public func ifPresent(@noescape f: (Wrapped) throws -> Void) rethrows {
        switch self {
        case .Some(let value): try f(value)
        case .None: ()

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The Sunk Cost Fallacy Fallacy

Arnout Engelen

Imagine two football fans planning to attend a match 60 miles away. One of them paid for a ticket in advance; the other was just about to buy a ticket when he got one from a friend for free. The night of the game, a blizzard hits. Which fan do you think is more likely to drive through a blizzard to see the game?

You probably (correctly) guessed that the fan who paid for his ticket is more likely to drive through the blizzard. What you may not have realized, though, is that this is an irrational decision, at least economically speaking.

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Docker to the on-premise rescue

Sebastiaan van Steenis

During the second day at Dockercon EU 2015 in Barcelona, Docker introduced the missing glue which they call "Containers as a Service Platform". With both focus on public cloud and on-premise, this is a great addition to the eco system. For this blogpost I would like to focus on the Run part of the "Build-Ship-Run" thought of Docker, and with the focus on on-premise. To realize this, Docker launched the Docker Universal Control Plane which was the project formerly known as Orca.

caas-private I got to play with version 0.4.0 of the software during a hands-on lab and I will try to summarize what I've learned.

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Are your node modules secure?

Gert Hengeveld

With over 200k packages, npm is the world's largest registry of open source packages. It serves several million downloads each month. The popularity of npm is a direct result of the popularity of JavaScript. Originally npm was the package manager for Node.js, the server-side JavaScript runtime. Since Node.js developers mostly follow the Unix philosophy, the npm registry contains many very small libraries tailored to a specific purpose. Since the introduction of Browserify, many of these libraries suddenly became suitable for use in the web browser. It has made npm not only the package manager for Node.js, but for the entire JavaScript ecosystem. This is why npm is not an abbreviation of Node Package Manager, but a recursive bacronymic abbreviation for "npm is not an acronym". Wow.

If you do any serious JavaScript development, you cannot go without libraries, so npm is an indispensable resource. Any project of meaningful size is quickly going to rely on several dozen libraries. Considering that these libraries often have a handful of dependencies of their own, your application indirectly depends on hundreds of packages. Most of the time this works out quite well, but sometimes things aren't that great. It turns out that keeping all of these dependencies up to date can be quite a challenge. Even if you frequently check your dependencies for updates, there's no guarantee that your dependencies' authors will do the same. With the pace at which new JavaScript packages are being released, it's close to impossible to keep everything up to date at all times.

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Robot Framework and the keyword-driven approach to test automation - Part 1 of 3

Michael Hallik

Hans Buwalda is generally credited with the introduction of the keyword-driven paradigm of functional test automation, initially calling it the 'action word' approach.

This approach tackled certain fundamental problems pertaining to the efficiency of the process of creating test code (mainly the lack of reuse) and the maintainability, readability and robustness of that code. Problems surrounding these aspects frequently led to failed automation efforts. The keyword-driven framework therefore was (and is) a quantum leap forward, providing a solution to these problems by facilitating the application of modularity, abstraction and other design patterns to the automation code.

Robot Framework (RF) can be regarded as the epitome of this type of automation framework. Our first post on the RF concentrated on the high-level design of the platform. In this second of our three-part series of introductory-level posts, we will take a closer look at what the keyword-driven approach to test automation is all about.

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Agile, but still really not Agile? What Pipeline Automation can do for you. Part 3.

Michiel Sens

Organizations adopting Agile and teams delivering on a feature-by-feature basis producing business value at the end of every sprint. Quite possibly this is also the case in your organization. But do these features actually reach your customer at the same pace and generate business value straight away? And while we are at it: are you able to actually use feedback from your customer and apply it for use in the very next sprint?

Possibly your answer is “No”, which I see very often. Many companies have adopted the Agile way of working in their lines of business, but for some reason ‘old problems’ just do not seem to go away...

Hence the question:

“Do you fully capitalize on the benefits provided by working in an Agile manner?”

Straight forward Software Delivery Pipeline Automation might help you with that.

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Bringing Agile to the Next Level

Paul Takken

The Best is Yet to Come written on desert roadI finished my last post with the statement Agile will be applied on a much wider scale in the near future. Within governmental organizations, industry, startups, on a personal level, you name it.  But how?  In my next posts I will deep dive in this exciting story lying in front of us in five steps:

Blogpost/Step I: Creating Awareness & Distributing Agile Knowledge
Change is a chance, not a threat.  Understanding and applying the Agile Mindset and toolsets will help everyone riding the wave of change with more pleasure and success.  This is the main reason why I’ve joined initiatives like Nederland Kantelt, EduScrum, Wikispeed and Delft University’s D.R.E.A.M. Hall.

Blogpost/Step II: Fit Agile for Purpose
The Agile Manifesto was originally written for software.  Lots of variants of the manifesto emerged the last couple of years serving different sectors and products. This is a good thing if the core values of the agile manifesto are respected.

However, agile is not applicable for everything.  For example, Boeing will never apply Scrum directly for producing critical systems.  They’re applying Scrum for less critical parts and R&D processes. For determining the right approach they use the Cynefin framework.  In this post I will explain this framework making it a lot easier where you could apply Agile and where you should be careful.

Blogpost/Step III: Creating a Credible Purpose or “Why”
You can implement a new framework or organization, hire the brightest minds and have loads of capital, in the end it all boils down to real passion and believe. Every purpose should be spot on in hitting the center of the Golden Circle.  But how to create this fontainebleau in spring?

Blogpost/Step IV: Breaking the Status Quo and Igniting Entrepreneurship
Many corporate organizations are busy or have implemented existing frameworks like SAFe or successful Agile models from companies like Netflix and Spotify.  But the culture change which goes with it, is the most important step. How to spark a startup mentality in your organization?  How to create real autonomy?

Compass with needle pointing the word organic. Green and grey tones over beige background, Conceptual illustration for healthy eating and organic farming.Blogpost/Step V: Creating Organic Organizations
Many Agile implementations do not transform organizations in being intrinsically Agile.  To enable this, organizations should evolve organically, like Holacracy.   They will become stronger and stronger by setbacks and uncertain circumstances.  Organic organizations will be more resilient and anti-fragile.  In fact, it’s exactly how nature works.  But how can you work towards this ideal situation?

Dancing with GetKanban (Using POLCA)

Pieter Rijken

Very recently POLCA got some attention on twitter. The potential and application of POLCA to knowledge work I explained in my blog 'Squeeze more out of kanban with POLCA!' [Rij11] of 4 years ago.

In this blog the GetKanban [GetKanban] game is played by following the the initial 'standard' rules for handling Work in Progress (WiP) limits and by changing the rules of the game inspired by POLCA (See [POLCA]).

The results show an equal throughput between POLCA and non-overlapping WiP limits, with smaller inventory size in the case of POLCA way of approaching WiP limits.

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